The Beatles first radio interview (10/27/1962)

The Beatles first radio interview (10/27/1962)


It’s a very great pleasure for us this evening to say hello to an up-and-coming Merseyside group, The Beatles. I know their names, and I’m going to try and put faces to them. Now, you’re John Lennon, aren’t you? – Yes, that’s right. What do you do in the group, John? I play harmonica, rhythm guitar, and vocal. That’s what they call it. – Then, there’s Paul McCartney. That’s you?
– Yeah, that’s me. Yeah. – And what do you do? – Play bass guitar and uhh, sing? …I think! That’s what they say.
– That’s quite apart from being vocal?” – Well… yes, yes. – Then there’s George Harrison. – How d’you do.
– How d’you do. What’s your job? – Uhh, lead guitar and sort of singing. – By playing lead guitar does that mean that you’re sort of leader of the group or are you…? – No, no. Just… Well you see, the other guitar is the rhythm. Ching, ching, ching, you see. – He’s solo guitar, you see. John is in fact the leader of the group. – And over in the background, here, and also in the background of the group making a lot of noise is Ringo Starr. – Hello.
– You’re new to the group, aren’t you Ringo? – Yes, umm, nine weeks now. – Were you in on the act when the recording was made of ‘Love Me Do’?
– Yes, I’m on the record. I’m on the disc. – It’s down on record, you know?
I’m the drummer! – What’s that offensive weapon you’ve got there? Those are your drumsticks? – Well, it’s umm… just a pair of sticks I found. I just bought ’em, you know, ‘cuz we’re going away. And I’ve put my name on. And it’s good, you know. – When you say you’re going away, that leads us on to another question now. Where are you going? – Germany. Hamburg. For two weeks. – You have standing and great engagements over there, haven’t you? – Well, the boys have been there quite alot, you know. And I’ve been there with other groups, but this is the first time I’ve been there with the Beatles. – Paul, tell us. How do you get in on the act in Germany? – Well, it was all through an old agent. – We first went there for a fella who used to manage us, and Mr. Allan Williams of the Jacaranda Club in Liverpool. And he found the engagements so we sort of went there, and then went under our own… – Steam.
– Steam…as they say. – As they say, afterwards, you know. And we’ve just been going backwards and forwards and backwards and forwards. – You’re not busy at all? – Well yes, actually. Yes. It’s been left-leg in all the war. – George, were you brought up in Liverpool? – Yes. So far, yes. – Whereabouts? – Well, born in Wavertree, and bred in Wavertree and Speke– where the airplanes are, you know. – Are you all ‘Liverpool types,’ then?
– Yes – Uhh… types, yes.
– Oh yeah. – Liverpool-typed Paul, there. Now, I’m told that you were actually in the same form as young Ron Wycherley… – Ronald. Yes.
– …now Billy Fury. – In Saint Silas.
– In which? – Saint Silas.
– Really? – It wasn’t Dingle Bay like you said in the Musical Express.
– No, that was wrong. Saint Sylus school. – Now I’d like to introduce a young disc jockey who helps us out with programmes at Cleaver and Clatterbridge Hospitals. His name is Malcolm Threadgill, he’s 16-years old, and I’m sure he’d like to ask some questions from the teenage point of view. – Thank you. I understand you’ve made other recordings before on a German label.
– Yeah. – What ones were they? – Well, we didn’t make… First of all we made a recording with a fella called Tony Sheridan. We were working in a club called ‘The Top Ten Club’ in Hamburg. And we made a recording with him called, ‘My Bonnie,’ which got to number five in the German Hit Parade. – Ach tung! – But it didn’t do a thing over here, you know. It wasn’t a very good record, but the Germans must’ve liked it a bit. And we did an instrumental which was released in France on an EP of Tony Sheridan’s, which George and John wrote themselves. That wasn’t released here. It got one copy. That’s all, you know. It didn’t do anything. – You composed ‘P.S. I Love You’ and ‘Love Me Do’ yourself, didn’t you? Who does the composing between you? – Well, it’s John and I. We write the songs between us. It’s, you know… We’ve sort of signed contracts and things to say, that now if we… – It’s equal shares.
– Yeah, equal shares and royalties and things, so that really we just both write most of the stuff. George did write this instrumental, as we say. But mainly it’s John and I. We’ve written over about a hundred songs but we don’t use half of them, you know. We just happened to sort of rearrange ‘Love Me Do’ and played it to the recording people, and ‘P.S. I Love You,’ and uhh, they seemed to quite like it. So that’s what we recorded. – And that was Paul McCartney telling you all about it.
– Is there anymore of your own compositions you intend to record? Well, we did record another song of our own when we were down there, but it wasn’t finished enough. So, you know, we’ll take it back next time and see how they like it then.” Well… that’s all from MY end! – I would like to just ask you– and we’re recording this at Hume Hall, Port Sunlight– Did any of you come over to this side before you became famous, as it were? Do you know this district? – Well, we played here, uhh… I don’t know what you mean by famous, you know. If being famous is being in the Hit Parade, we’ve been over here– we were here about two months ago. Been here twice, haven’t we? – I’ve got relations here. Rock Ferry.
– Have you? – Yes. Oh, all sides of the water, you know.”
– Yeah, I’ve got a relation in Claughton Village– Upton Road. – I’ve got a friend in Birkenhead!
– I wish I had. – I know a man in Chester! – Now, that’s a very dangerous thing to say. There’s a mental home there, mate. Peter Smethurst is here as well, and he looks like he is bursting with a question. There is just one question I’d like to ask. I’m sure it’s the question everyone’s asking. I’d like your impressions on your first appearance on television. – Well, strangely enough, we thought we were gonna be dead nervous. And everyone said, ‘You suddenly, when you see the cameras, you realize that there are two million people watching,’ because there were two million watching that ‘People And Places’ that we did… we heard afterwards. But, strangely enough, it didn’t come to us. We didn’t think at all about that. And it was much easier doing the television than it was doing the radio. It’s still nerve-wracking, but it was a bit easier than doing radio because there was a full audience for the radio broadcast. – Do you find it nerve-wracking doing this now?
– Yeah, yeah. Anyway, we hope we’ve got a full audience in both hospitals, Clatterbridge and Cleaver.
Over at Cleaver Hospital, a certain record on Parlophone– the top side has been requested for Eileen in Robert Cart Ward from Maddy. And, strangely enough, for Maddy from Eileen in the same ward. So perhaps the Beatles themselves would like to tell them what it’s going to be? – Yeah. Well, I think it’s gonna be ‘Love Me Do.’
– Parlophone R4949. – ‘Love Me Do.’
– And I’m sure, for them, the answer is P.S. I love you!

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100 thoughts on “The Beatles first radio interview (10/27/1962)

  1. This is a very revealing and interesting interview they hadn't a clue what was in store for them

    Thanks for posting

  2. cuties, but im really looking for the earliest radio or tv interview they had..!
    If someone know link me please

  3. Interesting….I'm no England expert, hell I'm Canadian. But they didn't even sound scouse back then. I guess its because "scouse" is changed compared to back then.

  4. Its was in Port Sunlight not Birkenhead its a village in the Wirral in Merseyside were i Live! My dad owns a house right opposite the hall

  5. MONTY: It's a very great pleasure for us this evening to say hello to an up-and-coming Merseyside group, The Beatles. I know their names, and I'm going to try and put faces to them. Now, you're John Lennon, aren't you?"
    JOHN: "Yes, that's right."

    MONTY: "What do you do in the group, John?"

    JOHN: "I play harmonica, rhythm guitar, and vocal. That's what they call it."

    MONTY: "Then, there's Paul McCartney. That's you?"

    PAUL: "Yeah, that's me. Yeah."

    MONTY: "And what do you do?"

    PAUL: "Play bass guitar and uhh, sing? …I think! That's what they say."

    MONTY: "That's quite apart from being vocal?"

    PAUL: "Well… yes, yes."

    MONTY: "Then there's George Harrison."

    GEORGE: "How d'you do."

    MONTY: "How d'you do. What's your job?"

    GEORGE: "Uhh, lead guitar and sort of singing."

    MONTY: "By playing lead guitar does that mean that you're sort of leader of the group or are you…?"

    GEORGE: "No, no. Just… Well you see, the other guitar is the rhythm. Ching, ching, ching, you see."

    PAUL: "He's solo guitar, you see. John is in fact the leader of the group."

    MONTY: "And over in the background, here, and also in the background of the group making alot of noise is Ringo Starr."

    RINGO: "Hello."

    MONTY: "You're new to the group, aren't you Ringo?"

    RINGO: "Yes, umm, nine weeks now."

    MONTY: "Were you in on the act when the recording was made of 'Love Me Do'?"

    RINGO: "Yes, I'm on the record. I'm on the disc."

    (the group giggles)

    RINGO: (comic voice) "It's down on record, you know?"

    MONTY: "Now, umm…"

    RINGO: "I'm the drummer!"

    (laughter)

    MONTY: "What's that offensive weapon you've got there? Those are your drumsticks?"

    RINGO: "Well, it's umm… just a pair of sticks I found. I just bought 'em, you know, 'cuz we're going away."

    MONTY: "When you say you're going away, that leads us on to another question now. Where are you going?"

    RINGO: "Germany. Hamburg. For two weeks."

    MONTY: "You have standing and great engagements over there, haven't you?"

    RINGO: "Well, the boys have been there quite alot, you know. And I've been there with other groups, but this is the first time I've been there with the Beatles."

    MONTY: "Paul, tell us. How do you get in on the act in Germany?"

    PAUL: "Well, it was all through an old agent."

    (laughter)

    PAUL: (chuckles) "We first went there for a fella who used to manage us, and Mr. Allan Williams of the Jacaranda Club in Liverpool. And he found the engagements so we sort of went there, and then went under our own…"

    JOHN: "Steam."

    PAUL: "Steam… (laughs)

    JOHN: "…as they say."

    PAUL: "As they say, afterwards, you know. And we've just been going backwards and forwards and backwards and forwards."

    MONTY: (surprised) "You're not busy at all?"

    PAUL: (jokingly) "Well yes, actually. Yes. It's me left leg. You know. The war."

    (laughter)

    MONTY: "George, were you brought up in Liverpool?"

    GEORGE: "Yes. So far, yes."

    MONTY: "Whereabouts?"

    GEORGE: "Well, born in Wavertree, and bred in Wavertree and Speke — where the airplanes are, you know."

    MONTY: "Are you all 'Liverpool types,' then?"

    RINGO: "Yes."

    JOHN: "Uhh… types, yes."

    PAUL: "Oh yeah."

    RINGO: "Liverpool-typed Paul, there."

    MONTY: "Now, I'm told that you were actually in the same form as young Ron Wycherley…"

    RINGO: "Ronald. Yes."

    MONTY: "…now Billy Fury."

    RINGO: "In Saint Sylus."

    MONTY: "In which?"

    RINGO: "Saint Sylus."

    JOHN: "Really?"

    RINGO: "It wasn't Dingle Vale like you said in the Musical Express."

    PAUL: "No, that was wrong. Saint Sylus school."

    MONTY: "Now I'd like to introduce a young disc jockey. His name is Malcolm Threadgill, he's 16-years old, and I'm sure he'd like to ask some questions from the teenage point of view."

    MALCOLM: "I understand you've made other recordings before on a German label."

    PAUL: "Yeah."

    MALCOLM: "What ones were they?"

    PAUL: "Well, we didn't make… First of all we made a recording with a fella called Tony Sheridan. We were working in a club called 'The Top Ten Club' in Hamburg. And we made a recording with him called, 'My Bonnie,' which got to number five in the German Hit Parade."

    JOHN: "Ach tung!"

    PAUL: (giggles) "But it didn't do a thing over here, you know. It wasn't a very good record, but the Germans must've liked it a bit. And we did an instrumental which was released in France on an EP of Tony Sheridan's, which George and John wrote themselves. That wasn't released here. It got one copy. That's all, you know. It didn't do anything."

    MALCOLM: "You composed 'P.S. I Love You' and 'Love Me Do' yourself, didn't you? Who does the composing between you?"

    PAUL: "Well, it's John and I. We write the songs between us. It's, you know… We've sort of signed contracts and things to say, that now if we…"

    JOHN: "It's equal shares."

    PAUL: "Yeah, equal shares and royalties and things, so that really we just both write most of the stuff. George did write this instrumental, as we say. But mainly it's John and I. We've written over about a hundred songs but we don't use half of them, you know. We just happened to sort of rearrange 'Love Me Do' and played it to the recording people, and 'P.S. I Love You,' and uhh, they seemed to quite like it. So that's what we recorded."

    MALCOLM: "Is there anymore of your own compositions you intend to record?"

    JOHN: "Well, we did record another song of our own when we were down there, but it wasn't finished enough. So, you know, we'll take it back next time and see how they like it then."

    (long pause)

    JOHN: (jokingly) "Well… that's all from MY end!"

    (laughter)

    MONTY: "I would like to just ask you– and we're recording this at Hume Hall, Port Sunlight– Did any of you come over to this side before you became famous, as it were? Do you know this district?"

    PAUL: "Well, we played here, uhh… I don't know what you mean by famous, you know.

    (laughter)

    PAUL: "If being famous is being in the Hit Parade, we've been over here– we were here about two months ago. Been here twice, haven't we?"

    JOHN: "I've got relations here. Rock Ferry."

    MONTY: "Have you?"

    JOHN: "Yes. Oh, all sides of the water, you know."

    PAUL: "Yeah, I've got a relation in Claughton Village– Upton Road."

    RINGO: (jokingly) "I've got a friend in Birkenhead!"

    (laughter)

    MONTY: "I wish I had."

    GEORGE: (jokingly) "I know a man in Chester!"

    (laughter)

    MONTY: "Now, that's a very dangerous thing to say. There's a mental home there, mate. Peter Smethurst is here as well, and he looks like he is bursting with a question."

    PETER: "There is just one question I'd like to ask. I'm sure it's the question everyone's asking. I'd like your impressions on your first appearance on television."

    PAUL: "Well, strangely enough, we thought we were gonna be dead nervous. And everyone said, 'You suddenly, when you see the cameras, you realize that there are two million people watching,' because there were two million watching that 'People And Places' that we did… we heard afterwards. But, strangely enough, it didn't come to us. We didn't think at all about that. And it was much easier doing the television than it was doing the (live musical performance) radio. It's still nerve-wracking, but it was a bit easier than doing radio because there was a full audience for the radio broadcast."

    MONTY: "Do you find it nerve-wracking doing this now?"

    (laughter)

    PAUL: (jokingly) "Yeah, yeah."

    MONTY: "Over at Cleaver Hospital, a certain record on Parlophone– the top side has been requested. So perhaps the Beatles themselves would like to tell them what it's going to be."

    PAUL: "Yeah. Well, I think it's gonna be 'Love Me Do.'"

    JOHN: "Parlophone R4949."

    (laughter)

    PAUL: "'Love Me Do.'"

    MONTY: "And I'm sure, for them, the answer is P.S. I love you!"

    PAUL: "Yeah."

  6. 27 DE OCTUBRE DE 1962
    Actuación en Hulme Hall, Port Sunlight en Birkenhead. Antes de tocar en éste concierto, el grupo grabó una entrevista con los muchachos del club a ser transmitida a los pacientes del “Cleaver and Clatterbridge Hospital”, en el Wirral, en el programa de radio “Sunday Spin”. Es la primera en donde se puede escuchar a Los Beatles hablando, se dan a conocer sus voces y su chispeante ingenio. John, Paul y George pueden ser escuchados

  7. I winder if the song they mentioned they intended to take back was 'Please Please Me'. After that and 'She Loves You' they absolutely exploded.

  8. Listening further in, I heard the reference to "hospital," and that leads me to believe this is the same interview that appeared on a flexidisc included in Lewisohn's now-out-of-print book "The Beatles Live." I own the book, but the disc has long since disappeared. Is this correct?

  9. This is cool. nine weeks only with Ringo. its surely the first interview and they don't know whats coming.they said they had written 100 songs already.
    only famous because on the hit parade they said.

  10. Very interesting never heard this , they were going back to the red light district of Germany what a shame their performances weren't recorded jhon always said it was there best work.

  11. Interesting how Paul states they had written around 100 tunes up to this point. I'll presume many of the tunes on their first 3 LP's or so, were part of this 100, although they neglected to mention song titles.

  12. Wow this is super early, before they even released "Please please me" I guess that's the song John was talking about that wasn't finished. Amazing, just think: In a little over a year later they would be the biggest group in the world, #1 in Europe and the USA, everywhere.

  13. I'm STILL looking for a video of that first tv appearance. also I wanna find that tv appearance where they're all wearing those black turtle necks – they play Twist and Shout and other songs i'm sure. if anyone can lead me to these 2 performances – preferably uncut – i'd appreciate it. thanks for the upload.

  14. I nearly flipped out of my chair when Paul Said" That He and John had written nearly 100 songs".I know that a several of them were rehearsed, by the Beatles in January 1969,during The Get Back Sessions.

  15. Their rise was so fast and so quick its hard to fathom how 4 young men could handle that level of success so quickly. I think John and Paul really wanted it and so did George. But Ringo probably thought he would be some backround drummer for several Liverpool rock bands. Id bet this their rise was most shocking for him. In america at first he was easily the most famous Beatle.

  16. Paul: "…John is in fact the leader of the group…"

    That's about the only time I have ever heard that!!!

  17. The Beatles rise to world acclaim is nothing short of extraordinary. As a pragmatic atheist, I’m not inclined towards magical tales of fate and wonder, but The Beatles story has me doubting my conviction that there isn’t a higher power at play.

  18. Amazing piece of history, I love delving into the true geniuses of culture in their early days where they were completely untouched by the pressure and economics of prominence. They weren't "working" as such, just pure creativity and love for their craft. It is true inspiration for me.

  19. Here is a transcript of this interview, in case anyone is having trouble understanding what they are saying:
    http://www.beatlesinterviews.org/db1962.1028.beatles.html

  20. 14 months later they would make their first film and appear on the Ed Sullivan show in America, becoming internationally famous.
    The rest is history.

  21. It's amazing at this point they weren't even sure about themselves as singers by saying "sort of".

  22. The old black and white photos while interesting are very dreary and must have been taken in and around Liverpool.

  23. What's great about this is that Ringo doesn't actually play the drums on Love Me Do because it's Andy White – but he is correct that he does play on the record: he plays tambourine!

  24. They're so unknown (to the interviewer at least!) that Ringo is introduced as "Ring-O" not Rin-Go (with a hard "G").

  25. Fascinating to listen to this, knowing as we all do what was to come. In just over a year, they would become the world's biggest entertainment story… and they'd hold that title forever. I'm sure that the "other song we recorded" that John is referring to at 4:50 is "Please Please Me" — the first time they demo'ed it for George Martin, it was a slow Roy Orbison style ballad and Martin told them to pep it up a bit and they'd try it again… and it became their first Number One.

  26. This is a gem a real GEM the Beatles are still rather unknown and a bit shy not so funny and outgoing than a year later. But the reporter is far from shy asking almost too many questions, a year later the tables turn and The Beatles are in control and really themselves. Wow great job to load up this Gem.

  27. This was marvelous. It doesn’t seem possible that they went on to do everything they did in only 8 years. My goodness, how they worked! And how they changed in that relatively short period of time! They not only changed themselves, they changed the whole world.

  28. John 22 by a few weeks, Ringo 22 a few months before, George 19 turning 20 following Feb and Paul 20 previous June. They probably knew they were a tight band but felt they weren't going to last much longer than a year. It's just jarring.

  29. I think Paul always acknowledged John to be the "leader of the group". None of the others had any problems with that…at least in the EARLY days!

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